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Art Journaling: Quotes


If you saw our group’s art journal pages on display, I wonder if you would be able to guess how old the artists are.

Artist's age: 8
Artist's age: 12


Artist's age: 9

Artist's age: 10


Artist's age: 12
Artist age: 10

Their work is mature beyond their years.  






I wonder why this is...Is it talent?  It is interest?  Is it passion?  

I don’t know.  What I do know is that magic happens when they are together...  



...and that I love every single minute of it.  



Comments

  1. Those are so beautiful. Your girls are blessed to have such a great group of friends to share this with.

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    Replies
    1. It is one of my blessings that I count often!

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  2. Replies
    1. I look forward to this group meeting. It is always the highlight of my week!

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  3. I am so impressed with the quality of the artwork of your girls and thier friends. I've always wanted to ask you this, but are each of your girls entirely self-taughts as artists? Have you ever watched any DVD series or gone through any books that were step by step guides? I always believed when my kids were younger in not going to art classes or telling them exactly how to draw or paint. They'd spend hours painting when they were three and four,never really drawing that much, though. Lately, though, in the past two years, they rarely want to paint or draw- maybe once or twice every few months. I know every kid will be strong in different areas, and I never draw or paint, so they don't see me doing it. But I always wished I could draw or paint. Now I wouldn't mind more direct tips and instruction to help me. I had heard about a great DVD series that helps teach drawing, but I've forgotten what it is. Do you have any recommendations for resources we could use to give us tips and pointers for becoming better drawers?

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    Replies
    1. Christina,
      Lilah has had a few lesson several in pottery, one in tile mosaics, and one in manga. Both girls took a class in mixed media. For the most part they have taught themselves by taking out tons of books from the library and practicing. We have no dvds and I would not know what to recommend. See what your library offers in the children's department and get decent supplies. One good set of markers, colored pencils and pens can make a huge difference in willingness to create.

      If your children like manga, I recommend anything by Chris Hart. I also love using Pinterest. My girls always search through my pins to find inspiration.

      I hope this helps!
      Jess

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  4. Every one of these is just gorgeous (the singing bird is my fave)! They should open an Etsy store! :)

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    Replies
    1. I will tell them that! Thank you for the compliment. They amaze me every time we meet!

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  5. Beautiful from talented little girls.

    ADG

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  6. So much expression in all of the art. I love the boldness, the colors, the passion of it all. The fun and joy is evident. I love that it is a group getting energy from each other. How fun is that???

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    Replies
    1. It is fun and it is the embodiment of positive energy. Having this emanate from a group of girls so young never ceases to amaze me!

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  7. I love these! I've started teaching a couple of art journaling classes at my daughter's school/homeschool resource center; I'm drawing on your blog for inspiration. :-)

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  8. lovely works by kids .. let me know how I can connect with you .. ... like to display work of kids to www.TwinklingCube.com/yourwall

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  9. can you explain the process for the waving letter quotes they are glorious! I wuld like to do some of your ideas with my grand children this summer

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    Replies
    1. 1) Use a piece of scrap paper
      2) Break quote up into like sized lines
      3) draw that many wavy lines to write in
      4) use large lettering to write our your quote
      5) color as if it were a coloring page
      We found that bold colors look best. I filled in my white space on the top and bottom with zentangle like ovals.
      I hope this helps. Feel free to write back here or contact me via email which is on my sidebar.

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    2. I should have said that the scrap paper was very helpful for planning the page. They worked in their Swarthmore journals for the final piece.

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